Using IfElse Data Function for multiple checks in single condition

Consider a situation wherein you need to check multiple conditions in a single condition while using IfElse data function.

Example:
Variables:
a = 3, b = 4, c = 5

Condition you need to check:
if a is less than b and if b is less than c

Phrazor execution using IfElse data function:

Normally, the IfElse data function takes in a truth value of a condition as a first parameter, and second parameter is the expected result if the first parameter is True and third parameter is the expected result if the first parameter is False.

In order to check your condition, you need to use the CompareValues function or some other function which results into True / False.

To check multiple conditions however, you might think of using the IfElse data function in a nested form which can get a little more complicated, since you would have to add the Else part for multiple conditions (as shown below) which is not necessary in you case.

IfElse( CompareValues(a, b, "l"), IfElse( CompareValues(a, b, "l"), "Do this", "nested_else" ), "Do Something Else" )

In the above formula, you can see that the “nested_else” part of the formula is which is not defined as per your requirement, since your need is to check both the conditions at once in a single condition like this:

If a < b and b < c: "Do this" Else: "Do Something Else"

Rather than using IfElse like in the above formula, you could compare the two conditions separately and than again compare if their result is True and basis that execute the IfElse data function.

Condition_1 : CompareValues(a, b, "l")
Condition_2 : CompareValues(b, c, "l")

IfElse( CompareValues( Condition_1, Condition_2, ”e"), "Do this", "Do Something Else")

Note that in this formula, where the results of Condition_1 and Condition_2 are compared to check if they are equal, what are comparing is whether both their results are True similar to our requirement where we want to check:

If a < b and b < c:

Executing as per this formula avoids the a of defining unnecessary “else” parts.